Current Edition : Inequality Special Issue

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Brexit, Trump, the 99%, the Precariat…. All around the world ‘Inequality’ has been blamed as the root cause for the disintegration of the economic and political status quo.

But what does Inequality actually look like in Australia? Is there cause for concern or are we just caught up in global scape-goating?

Is Inequality an illness or simply a symptom? What are the political pathways that have influenced inequity? How deeply is it ingrained in the personal and economic freedoms we take for granted?

And are we heading for a paradigm-shifting collapse?

 

The 2017 AQ Special Edition turns the spotlight on the debate over Inequality in Australia, with the aim of solidifying what is often a fluid and ill-conceived concept.

Bringing together some of Australia’s most respected minds, the new Special Edition tackles the issue from a multitude of sides, pulling apart the concept and digging through the mess. Featuring such luminaries as Eva Cox AO, Prof Frank Stilwell and Prof Peter Whiteford, this is an engaging and informative exploration of the fabric of Australia.

Are we still the country of the ‘Fair Go’? What have been the choices and the forces that have lead us to where we are? And where do we go from here?

Don’t miss out on this important addition to the debate! Subscribe to an annual print subscription of AQ for only $26! Digital subscriptions are as little as $15 a year! Subscribe now.

AQ continues to deliver in-depth and independent analyses of the topics that are shaping Australia. With longer-style articles written by the people at the forefront of the debates, AQ is unique in bridging the gap between journal and magazine, combining the compelling writing of a glossy with the intellectual rigour of a journal.

FEATURING:

 

Redefining Inequality: It’s the Inequity of Social Trust, not ‘the Economy, Stupid’

The popular definition of inequality relies heavily on materialistic differences. Yet when viewed as systemic, rather than materialistic, the question becomes how to interpret the effects of inequality as symptoms of unfair systems – systems that generate antisocial distrust and undermine social cohesion. It is no coincidence that, as inequality rises, trust in our public and political systems hits historic lows. So what is the connection between trust and growing material disadvantage, and why are we on the verge of a cultural paradigm shift?

Eva Cox AO

 

Drowning in the Rising Tide: Policy and Inequality in Australia

Inequality has become the defining idea of the early 21st Century. Unusually – for an economic concept – it has captured the public imagination. Yet what have been the political and legislative forces that have accentuated inequality in Australia, and what could be done to rectify the trend? With the Australian workforce and the nature of wealth changing, have the macro and micro decisions made by subsequent governments been in the best interests of everyone?

David Hetherington


Divided Cities, Divided County

The more unequal the society the more intense the social issues – and the inequalities between people, according to where they live, are well known in Australia. Sydney’s Mosman, Melbourne’s Toorak, North Adelaide and Perth’s Peppermint Grove – while poorer households inhabit whatever places they can afford with lower incomes. Where we live – suburb, city, rural – can be the most salient indicator of our different socioeconomic positions, and can result in vicious cycles that further entrench inequity. Yet there are solutions…

YOUR FREE ARTICLE: Spatial Inequality – THEN & NOW: 44 years ago Frank Stilwell first wrote for AQ on the topic of Spatial Inequality. To celebrate this we are releasing the full text of his 1973 article so that you can compare how much (or how little) has changed in the intervening years. Read/Download the article

Frank Stilwell

 

Social Enterprise in Australia: The Need for a Social Innovation Ecosystem

Australia has a history of relying on independent charities as a social safety net – yet globally the model is changing. Social Enterprises, for-profit businesses with a socially beneficial outcome, are increasingly important in tackling intractable problems such as homelessness. They provide skills, training and support for many that have fallen between the cracks of faltering capitalism. But what is the landscape like for social innovation in Australia? How can we do more to support revolution at the fringes of society?

Chris Mason

 

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